Virtual Offices in Silicon Valley: Modern Business Solutions in the World’s Tech Hub

Silicon Valley: the home of Facebook, Apple, Google, and dozens of other technology companies known for their unqualified success and the way their products have changed they way we live. A Silicon Valley startup company is synonymous with innovation and the potential for unbelievable prosperity. Unfortunately, for those scrappy entrepreneurs aspiring to be the next Zuckerbergs, Silicon Valley is not only known for a hub of innovation and commerce, it is also home to some of the most expensive office (and residential) space in America. Fortunately for those who have yet to make their billions, CloudVO offers a 21st century solution to small business owners who are not quite ready to build a corporate campus rivaling Google’s.

Virtual Office Space: How it Works

Work in a coffee shop and have a real business address with CloudVO's Virtual Office Space Solutions!CloudVO’s virtual office solutions allows a small business owner to have an official office presence in Silicon Valley at a fraction of the cost of actually renting office space. Do you work from home, but still need to meet clients or investors occasionally, and would rather not do it in a coffee shop? Would a Silicon Valley business address or phone number give your startup important legitimacy? Do you need someone to occasionally answer the phone, but don’t want to hassle with an actual employee? CloudVO allows you to package services that will meet these needs and more, allowing you to pay for only what you need.

Services Provided

CloudVO offers three main categories of virtual office services. First, CloudVO offers business addresses and mail forwarding. This service allows your business to have an actual address in some of Silicon Valley’s premier office spaces (more on this later). Mail sent to your virtual office is forwarded to whatever address you choose. Second, CloudVO can provide live telephone answering services for your business. This allows you to have a local or toll free number, without you personally having to deal with phone calls. Depending on your needs, those who call your business line can either be directly forwarded to a phone number of your choice, or your businesses voicemail. Through CloudVO’s live phone answering service, one of CloudVO’s professional and friendly receptionists will answer your business line with the name of your company, and then take a message or forward the call to you. Lastly, CloudVO offers private and shared workspaces and meeting rooms to use, on a subscription or hourly rental basis. This service allows you to meet with your clients or investors at your business address in an impressive conference room or  day office, with a professional administrative staff on location to greet your guests.

Locations in the Silicon Valley

CloudVO offers virtual offices in some of the best locations in the Silicon Valley area. How about an office in Cupertino, blocks away from Apple’s corporate campus and within two miles of other giants in the technology business? Maybe an office in Palo Alto, within minutes of Stanford University and with easy access to the East Bay would suit your needs better? Check out these and other great locations CloudVO offers in the Silicon Valley area.

Virtual Office Solutions

The personal computer, smartphones, and social media have all changed the way we live. Now virtual office space is changing the way we do business. The rise of technology has made working from home possible in a way unimaginable thirty years ago, but small businesses owners and entrepreneurs still find themselves needing the services and legitimacy that only a physical office can provide. CloudVO is the answer. With a virtual office space, get what you need and don’t pay for the extra.


About CloudVO ™

CloudVO is the umbrella brand of Cloud Officing Corp, headquartered in San Francisco, California. CloudVO’s mission is to provide comprehensive virtual office, coworking and meeting room solutions to professionals under a Workplace-as-a-Service™ model. CloudVO operates the CloudMeetingRooms.com and CloudVirtualOffice.com e-commerce sites and grants preferential access to day offices, coworking space, and professional meeting rooms at close to 500 locations worldwide for distributed workers on a subscription or a pay-per-use basis.

Virtual Office Space: Creating Your Business in Washington, D.C.

Are you a small business owner looking for a way to give your business a reputable face without breaking the bank? CloudVO’s virtual office solutions allow you to do just that. CloudVO provides affordable mail plans, coworking and meeting spaces, business addresses, and administrative services in Washington, D.C.

Why a Virtual Office?

You can have a virtual office space by the Washington Monument!Maybe you are self-employed and are able to work from home, but occasionally need a setting to meet with clients that is more professional than the corner café. Perhaps you would like an address for your business that is not in the middle of the suburbs or a P.O. Box. Maybe you need an office presence in D.C., however, would rather not pay for office space considered by Forbes to be the third-most expensive in America. CloudVO can meet all these needs and more by allowing businesses to tailor a service package to their specific needs.

Virtual Office Services Provided

CloudVO offers three main categories of virtual office services. First, CloudVO offers business addresses and mail forwarding services. This service allows your business to have an actual address at some of Washington D.C.’s premier office spaces (more on this later). Mail sent to your virtual office is forwarded to whatever address you choose. Second, CloudVO can provide phone and live answering services for your business. This allows you to pick a local D.C. or toll free number for your business. Depending on your needs, those who call your business line can either be directly forwarded to a phone number of your choosing, or your businesses voicemail. Through CloudVO’s live answering service, one of CloudVO’s professional and friendly receptionists will answer your business line with the name of your company, and then take a message or forward the call to you depending on your needs. Lastly, CloudVO offers actual office space and conference rooms to use and meet in, on a subscription or rental basis. This service allows you to meet with your clients at your business address in an impressive conference room or office, with professional office staff on location to meet your clients.

Prestigious Location in Washington DC

Washington D.C. is the political center of the United States, perhaps the political center of the world. Prestige matters when you are dealing with the world’s power brokers. Unfortunately, D.C. is ranked only behind New York City and San Francisco as having the priciest office space rent in the country. Get a D.C. office without paying thousands of dollars a month. CloudVO offers business addresses at a variety of distinguished locations throughout D.C. area. Whether you need a business address or a meeting room a block away from the Capitol Building, or an office just up the street from the Oval Office and the White House, CloudVO has workspaces available for you. If you prefer a business address offering office space surrounded by upscale restaurants and shopping as well as numerous foreign embassies, CloudVO has a place for you. Now offering fourteen excellent virtual office locations across D.C. in addition to numerous options in nearby Baltimore, Arlington, and Alexandria.

The 21st Century Solution to Your Office Needs

While companies like Airbnb and Uber revolutionize the way we travel, CloudVO is changing the way business owners meet their office space needs. CloudVO allows you and your business to have a prestigious location without paying astronomically high rent. You can have a receptionist without worrying about how to keep them busy. CloudVO gives you and your businesses the ability to get the services you need, without having to pay for the things you don’t.


About CloudVO ™

CloudVO is the umbrella brand of Cloud Officing Corp, headquartered in San Francisco, California. CloudVO’s mission is to provide comprehensive virtual office, coworking and meeting room solutions to professionals under a Workplace-as-a-Service™ model. CloudVO operates the CloudMeetingRooms.com and CloudVirtualOffice.com e-commerce sites and grants preferential access to day offices, coworking space, and professional meeting rooms at close to 500 locations worldwide for distributed workers on a subscription or a pay-per-use basis.

The Advantages of Using Virtual Office Space

With the advancements in the field of technology and communication, it seems that virtual office space is starting to become the norm.

entrepreneur-593371_640If your business follows flexible work hours, or you are outsourcing employees from halfway across the world, a digital office gives people the opportunity to conveniently work wherever and whenever.

Sadly, some people are still skeptical about this idea. Most of them think that the tools they need are expensive, or having much freedom at work becomes a hindrance to productivity.

To set the record straight and clarify some issues, this article will list down some of the key benefits of using an online office space.

1. Say goodbye to commuting problems

Don’t you just hate it when your staff is always late due to heavy traffic? If you let him work as a virtual assistant, you can be sure that he can report to work on time. Even if you are the boss of your own company, you understand how difficult it is to drive or commute to work. With a virtual office, you can increase your productivity and become more focused at work.

2. Employees will become more physically active

According to a research from the University of Sydney’s Department of Public Health, sitting at your chair for more than 11 hours every day will increase your chances of dying in the next three years. If you give your staff a flexible work schedule, it will be easier for them to find time for rest and physical exercise.

hands-woman-legs-laptop3. You access a wider pool of talent

As your business expands internationally, it is ideal that you outsource staff from the local community. Since they are already knowledgeable about their own fellowmen, it will be easier for them to build good relationships with customers. Sometimes, maintaining offshore staff also costs less as compared to hiring local talent.

4. You can reduce your overhead costs

Building a virtual workstation means that you do not have to spend so much money on office lease, utility bills, or other expensive costs gained from maintaining a brick-and-mortar office.

Of course, you need to invest in software and a little bit of hardware, but they are not that expensive. This will allow you to invest in and focus more on hiring talented employees.

The Wrap-Up

A virtual workstation is effective if you are managing a small business or if you are expanding abroad. Compared to a traditional office space, virtual office solutions do not require you to spend a lot on furniture or hardware, and services such as live phone answering or hourly meeting rooms can save you money. Your employees will also benefit from this setup because they don’t need to commute and their schedule will be flexible.


About CloudVO ™

CloudVO is the umbrella brand of Cloud Officing Corp, headquartered in San Francisco, California. CloudVO’s mission is to provide comprehensive virtual office, coworking and meeting room solutions to professionals under a Workplace-as-a-Service ™ model. CloudVO operates the CloudMeetingRooms.com and CloudVirtualOffice.com e-commerce sites and grants preferential access to day offices, coworking space, and professional meeting rooms at close to 500 locations worldwide for distributed workers on a subscription or a pay-per-use basis.

Heard at GCUC Last Week

Our Team of Experts at GCUC
Our Team of Experts at GCUC

Last week, our CloudVO Team of Experts attended GCUC in L.A. There were several discussions about building a stronger community and brand. Our Team of Experts provide answers to two popular questions heard at GCUC.

Are smaller meeting rooms better?
Is that wise to monetize meeting rooms?
The questions came up multiple times.  Is it better to have a large training room or use the space with several smaller size meeting rooms?  What’s the optimum ratio between open collaborative space and private meeting rooms?  There was much debate on these questions, which we have tackled in a recent meeting room business white paper you can find on CloudVO’s Resource Center for shared workspace operators.

How to develop new line of services?
Another question that came up several times was “How can I be helpful to my community and generate more revenue?”. One area that was not discussed much, but we want to bring to everyone’s attention, is live phone answering services. This is particularly helpful if your members would benefit from call screening or need to establish a strong business identity. Many attorneys and consultants have that need, however so do start-ups faced with a high volume of customer or investor calls. Find out how CloudVO can help with our outsourced CloudAnswering Services.


About CloudVO ™
CloudVO is the umbrella brand of Cloud Officing Corp, headquartered in San Francisco, California. CloudVO’s mission is to provide comprehensive virtual office, coworking and meeting room solutions to professionals under a Workplace-as-a-Service ™ model. CloudVO operates the CloudMeetingRooms.com and CloudVirtualOffice.com e-commerce sites and grants preferential access to day offices, coworking space, and professional meeting rooms at close to 500 locations worldwide for distributed workers on a subscription or a pay-per-use basis.

Join the LinkedIN Workplace-as-a-Service ™ group for more data driven discussions on our industry.

Freelancing in America & GWA’s Role

This post reflects the results from a survey conducted by Edelman Berland of over 7,000 U.S. workforce members on Freelancing in America, whose Result Desk was published on October 1, 2015, and the need to corral the voice of coworking providers via the Global Workspace Association.

Here are some of the salient data from the survey, with meaningful implications for the coworking industry.

breakdownoffreelancers
Source: Edelman Berland Freelancing in America Survey, Oct 1, 2015
  • 34% of workforce are freelancers, or 53.7 million people
  • This represents a growth of 1.3% from prior year, which is remarkable – in the past, the number of freelancers would decrease in upswings of an economic cycle as people returned to “stable” jobs in large companies. The fact that this has not been the case in this particular cycle points to individual lifestyle choices, which corroborates the results of the poll.
  • 60% of freelancers indeed said they started more by choice versus necessity, up 7% from the previous year. Youngest and oldest generations are most likely to start freelancing by choice, driven by flexibility and freedom.
  • The majority of freelancers who left traditional employment earn more now, with 3 in 4 earning more within 1 year.
  • Technology is making it easer for freelancers to find work online. 51% had obtained a project online.
  • 50% said they would not quite freelancing for any traditional job.
  • 3 in 4 non-freelancers said they are open to doing additional work outside their primary jobs.

Worth noting is that all of the increase came from the “Diversified Workers”, which grew 8% from 2014 to 2015. Diversified workers are made of people from multiple sources of income, including part time jobs at a traditional work and freelancing. They are a growing segment of users we see on CloudVirtualOffices and CloudMeetingRooms.

Not all of the 53.7 million freelancers are candidate-users of coworking space. For example, construction contractors and Uber drivers are not a target marketing for coworking providers. But what this survey means is that the trend towards freelancing is meaningful, durable, and will require some changes in the mindset of political leaders and legislation. The coworking lobby (in the good sense of the word, i.e. be the voice of coworker) needs to become a significant force to evangelize what coworking is, and push for changes in legislations that currently do not factor the benefits of the sharing economy and people’s desire to achieve flexibility in their work. These efforts can be everyone’s responsibility, but also need to be corralled by a trade association like the Global Workspace Association. I know they are working on it. Good luck, Jamie Russo!

Significance of Jamie Russo’s Appointment as Leader of GWA

Jamie Russo, better than anyone, can build an Association that is commensurate with the growing importance our industry represents.

Image of Jamie Russo, newly appointed GWA President
Jame Russo

Last week, the Global Workspace Association (GWA) appointed Jamie Russo as its new Executive Director. This marks a tipping point for our Workspace-as-a-Service trade association for 5 main reasons.

Continue reading “Significance of Jamie Russo’s Appointment as Leader of GWA”

With WeWork’s Valuation at $10 billion, When Will The Workspace-as-a-Service Industry Reach $1 Trillion?

Is WeWork worth $10 billion? The answer is clearly yes for Fidelity Management & Research Co and other repeat investors who have invested $400 million in the company, making WeWork’s valuation roughly $10 billion, according to the Wall Street Journal and MorningStar.

Is WeWork worth $10 billion? The answer is clearly yes for Fidelity Management & Research Co and other repeat investors who have invested $400 million in the company, making WeWork’s valuation roughly $10 billion, according to the Wall Street Journal and MorningStar.

Ten billion is four times as much as Regus’ current market capitalization. When WeWork was valued at twice Regus’ just a few months ago, I wrote: “pretty impressive for a 4 year-old company that is surfing the coworking wave exceptionally well. We can only watch in awe.”

WeWork Cofounders
WeWork Cofounders, Miguel McKelvey and Adam Neumann
Now we need to look outside of the shared office industry to get a sense for the enormity of this achievement.

Ten billion is more than half the valuation of the largest publicly traded office landlord in the U.S., Boston Properties. When considering that WeWork leases 3.5 million squarefeet of office space, while Boston Properties owns 45 million square feet, it is clear that we are comparing apples and oranges, and that the main value here is not in bricks & mortar.

WeWork is not valued by its investors as a real estate firm. Rather, it is valued as a company that will disrupt traditional real estate. In the same way that Uber is not valued as a taxi company, but as a company that disrupts taxis. Or in the same way that AirBnB is not valued like a hotel, or like a simple reservation system, but as a company that disrupts the traditional lodging supply chain.

Landlords beware! Your world is changing.

The Morningstar article indicates that the WeWork valuation was about 100 times its operating income. This would suggest an operating profit of ~$100 million, or $28 per square foot per year. Most observers of the shared office space industry who have taken the trouble to reverse-engineer the WeWork operations, like myself, seriously doubt that they generate that much operating profit already.

This is why the story is even bigger than what the Wall Street Journal and Morningstar articles suggest. We believe the WeWork investors’ bet is a bet on a long-term model, with no expectation of achieving massive profitability any time soon.

WeWork Golden Gate
WeWork San Francisco – Golden Gate
We also believe that whether they will prove to be right or wrong, investors in WeWork have done their homework. Do not think, like I have heard some suggest, that this fundraising success is just the result of a good PR campaign, where naïve or lazy investors fell for smoke & mirrors. It would be way too simple.

Instead, it is the sign of a fundamental belief by these investors that the traditional office space is on a verge of a major disruption, the scale of which may even exceed what we have seen in the worlds of AirBnB and Uber and a belief that WeWork is well positioned to take advantage of this disruption.

We agree with this belief, particularly the first part of it. The disruptive value proposition of the sharing economy is real and the shared office space industry is one of the most logical and most valuable implementations of the sharing economy. This is true for coworking, as well as for other flavors of the Workspace-as-a-Service ™ industry that focus on convenience such as Virtual Offices or Proworking. Office Business Centers have a role to play in this change as well, particularly as their model evolves towards hybrid private offices and coworking space, with more focus on curating their communities.

On the other hand, we do not believe that WeWork could ever achieve a monopoly on the shared office space industry. That’s where the comparison with players in other sectors of the sharing economy ends. That’s where $10 billion represents a more significant leap of faith than we would be willing to make (even though we are believers!). Whereas Uber and Airbnb can build a credible case that “the winner takes all”, such won’t be the case in the shared office space. The barriers to entry are not that hard to overcome and users desires for spaces and types of communities will remain diverse.

WeWork is not a market place. It is a workplace provider. It only represents one of the many flavors that users want. Other providers will be successful proposing different flavors, in a large scale. Regus and now WeWork have shown the path.

In that sense, Starbucks is a better analogy to understand where WeWork may end up, if successful. Starbucks is the strongest, largest, most successful coffee shop company in the world. It is ubiquitous. But it does not have a monopoly. There are others, big and small. In the process Starbucks has helped change the way people drink coffee and it has raised the traffic to coffee shops, particularly their own. They also pushed out some of the local coffee shops that often –quite frankly- were not that great. But many local coffee shops, with good cofffe and personality, managed not only to survive but also to thrive.

WeWork Boston
WeWork Boston
We believe the same will happen to the Workspace-as-a-Service ™ industry. We believe that WeWork is only one of the several franchises that will establish their names in the industry. Meanwhile, WeWork, like Regus before them, greatly helps raise awareness of the shared office space, to the benefit of all operators, large and small. We believe investors have other ways to tap into this opportunity than to bet on a $10 billion valuation for a marginally profitable company. Other serious contenders are emerging, at less scary valuation levels and with possibly safer business models.

In the end-state, the traditional office space world will be significantly disrupted, but landlords who will ally themselves with Workspace-as-a-Service ™ operators to help evolve their space offering can take advantage of this massive change too.
Finally, we do believe that it is only a matter of time for the shared office space industry to reach a $1 trillion valuation, which is still a fraction of the entire commercial real estate space valuation. Give us a little bit more time for a prediction as to when. To be continued…

Author: Laurent Dhollande, CloudVO CEO

The Last Rush Hour (and why Google, Facebook, and Apple may become premature dinosaurs)

In the ebook, The Last Rush Hour, there is a striking analysis of the irony of seeing big Silicon Valley companies dis-intermediating time and distance, being the poster children for obsolete 20th century thinking of Centralized Corporate Offices.

In Frederick Pilot’s last book, The Last Rush Hour, available in an ebook format today, there is a striking analysis of the irony of seeing big Silicon Valley companies, which invented the technology tools that have empowered mobility, dis-intermediating time and distance, being the poster children for obsolete 20th century thinking of Centralized Corporate Offices.

Rush Hour

The mega campuses that Google, Facebook, and Apple continue to grow, with all possible amenities a worker may want, are of another age. Just more colorful, with free smoothies, free Hint mineral water, a chef, and a dry cleaner. But in the end, they are just Big Corporate Centralized Offices. They don’t eliminate commute time. In fact a few large Silicon Valley companies, like Yahoo! and HP, have actually reversed liberal telecommute policies, to get “all hands on deck.” Some say out of desperation, trying to treat symptoms rather than the deeper root cause of their problems.

This approach constrains these great companies to only access a workforce that want to live in this environment. Silicon Valley, where I write these lines, is a great place to live, but not all the best and brightest engineering minds want to live here. You’ll also find them in Florida, Michigan, India, or New Zealand too. On the other hand, many surveys have shown that most everyone is happy to work remotely, and that collaborative work does not require daily physical proximity to be effective, not to mention that work teams are increasingly cross-functional, cross-companies, and cross-geographical, which makes the concept of daily physical proximity obsolete in this century.

As a result, the San Francisco Bay Area is the 3rd most congested area in the nation and thousands of workers, and their companies, are wasting hundreds of thousand hours with unproductive commute.

Are Google, Apple, and -sadly– also Facebook on their way to becoming premature dinosaurs? Will they soon be replaced by the increasing vitality of smaller, distributed entrepreneurs, working with each other in more dynamic informal circles, often out of coworking places, a more attractive work environment, for many millennials? The future will tell. It will be interesting to watch.

http://www.lastrushhour.com

Author: Laurent Dhollande, CloudVO CEO

A Coworking Safari

On July 9, 2014, we asked 27 CloudVO associates to spend their entire day in a coworking place and to share their experience on Yammer real time. This article presents a summary of some of the raw observations made by our group on that coworking safari day, without interpretation or judgment.

Methodology

The safari was designed to increase our organization’s knowledge of the coworking landscape. Fifty six percent (56%) of the participants had never coworked previously. The rule was for all participants to check in a location that promotes itself online as “coworking,” pay for a day pass, and share his or her experience and observations throughout the day via a moderated discussion forum on Yammer. Most of the discussions were structured – the moderator sent questions to the group throughout the day every ½ hour or so – but the participants also engaged in impromptu and highly interactive online conversations throughout the day. All data reported in this article was strictly based on those field observations.

Locations

The group checked-in 26 different coworking places in California and Nevada:

  • In 17 different cities
  • 16 locations were in the San Francisco Bay Area
  • 5 were in the Sacramento area
  • 4 were in other California areas (including LA & San Diego areas)
  • 1 location was in Reno, Nevada.

For the most part, participants picked locations close to their home or place of work. Since the majority were CloudVO employees, it is no surprise that the observations were skewed to Northern California, where the company main offices are located.

The vast majority of the operations visited by our group were dedicated coworking operations, with names like Hacker Dojo, NextSpace, The Port, The Hub, SandBox, Comerge, Enerspace, Urban Hive, San Leandro Coworking, Reno Collective, SpherePad, Hacker Lab, LapTop Lounge, ThinkHouse, Sillicon Valley Pad, Get Smartworkplaces, Sattelite, Comerge. One operation was a coworking place specifically designed for legal professionals (Thirty33 Legal Suites). Two locations advertised themselves as coworking places but were effectively touchdown space for professionals (e.g. MediaPod, with Courtyard by Marriott). The majority of the operations were for-profit operations, focused solely on coworking, but at least one was a non-profit operation, managed by and for its members.

Capacity & Usage

Half of the coworking places were small, with less than 40 coworking seat capacity, but 30% had more than 80 open coworking seats. Close to 40% of the locations offered private offices (ranging from 5 to 20 private offices). Most had collaborative space. Two-thirds provided private or semi-private conference rooms, ranging from 1 to 6 meeting rooms per location. 

Distributio of Coworking Seat Capacity Number of Users at Peak Time

Demographics

Whereas the majority of the coworkers on our safari day seemed to fall in the 31 to 39 years old age group, all ages were represented, including Millenials, Gen Y, Gen X, and Boomers. 

Population Age Breakdown

Pricing

Day Pass prices ranged from $10 to $75, with $25 as the median rate. A few locations offered free passes to “test drive” the coworking places. These free pass opportunities were not factored into our statistics.

The median monthly membership, with unlimited access was $295, also with a wide range from $79 to $475 per month. Many operators offer ten-day or five-day access at reduced prices. Dedicated desks, where users often leave their monitor, ranged from $300 to $550 with a median rate at $433/month. 

Published Prices

Amenities 

While a few of the smaller locations seemed to have spotty internet connections, most provided decent but not exceptional Internet connectivity. More surprisingly, only half of the locations seemed to provide some form of network printing. When available, printing was often free of charge.

Internet Connection Speed

Ambiance

Whereas community events are said to be the critical fabric of their place by most coworking operators, our observers could find events prominently posted in only 58% of the locations.

What really struck our safari participants is that the coworking locations were places to get work done. The image of informality some coworking places promote, with folks lounging on a couch with a beer on hand and a laptop on the knees, were no where to be seen. What the group observed instead were studious, library-style, work environments, where folks are by and large respectful of each other’s space and sound privacy. For example, most folks while making cell phone calls are careful not to do this in a way that disturbs other coworkers.

Coffee and beverage were very simple for the most part –no luxury!- but seemed to achieve their purpose.

Sound Level

Coffee Rating

Coworking Ambiance

Rate Your Coworking Experience

Join us for ‘Workspace-as-a-Service Safari Day’ in the Spring of 2015.

We would like to engage our entire industry in a Workspace-as-a-Service Safari Day in the spring of 2015. Let’s cover 100+ cities worldwide! Take one day out of your busy schedule to join our global field trip and in the process:

  • Help gather incredibly valuable data and help understand our changing industry.
  • Gain deep insights into the operations of other players in your space.
  • Enjoy the highly interactive format and benefit from the experience of hundreds of other participants in real time.

Here is how we would like to organize that day:

  • If you are a business center operator then check into a nearby coworking place or incubator for the day and offer other participants of the Safari a flat $40 rate to check into a day office at your center for that same day.
  • If you are a coworking operator, check into a nearby business center day office or an incubator and offer participants of the Safari a regular day pass at your center, not to exceed $40 for that day.
  • If you work for an incubator, check into a nearby business center day office or a coworking space for the day and offer participants of the Safari your regular coworking day pass at regular cost, not to exceed $40 for the day.

If you are interested in participating in the Spring 2015 World Workspace-as-a-Service Safari Day, please fill the following form.

We anticipate requesting participating operators to cap their Coworking Day Pass (coworking location), or Day Office Pass (Business Centers) at $40 max for any participants in the safari.

First Name

Last Name

Company Name

Your Email

Phone Number

Enter Address

Your Main Activity

For more information, consult our Workspace Provider Resource Center. Join our Workplace-as-a-Service ™ LinkedIN Discussion Group for more data-driven discussions with our community of workspace providers, one chewable data-bite at a time.

CloudVO ™ Team

Is it a Strategic Mistake for Business Centers to provide a Coworking Offering?

I am tempted to say: Yes, be careful!

Coworking CrossroadsThis answer may surprise many of you. I have been an enthusiastic observer of coworking ever since ‘The Work Club’ started in Emeryville, CA, in 2004. I believe that all players in the Workspace-as-a-Service arena will eventually converge to offer a menu of choices ranging from private offices and professional meeting rooms to coworking options, all under the same roof. Walking the walk, as CEO of Pacific Business Centers, I drove our own experimentation with coworking 3 years ago.

So am I disavowing my own coworking strategy while at the helm of Pacific?

Continue reading “Is it a Strategic Mistake for Business Centers to provide a Coworking Offering?”